Gonna Need a New Computer Soon

RadarScout

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Ok folks, I know there's a bunch of smart computer people on here. I need to buy a new computer since the one I currently have was built about the same time Apollo 1 was launched. It's gotten pretty slow and if there are any "motion" ads running, I can almost take a nap before it lets me scroll down the page.

Here's what I'm thinking. Is Dell so much better than HP that it warrants paying a good bit more for compatible components, processors, video and monitors? I will be using it primarily to read emails, read news and events, play Majong and hearts while listening to songs on Spotify. I'm the type that squeezes a Coke can to get the last drop, so it really needs to be something to last several years; future proof if possible. I'm thinking 16g, 1-2tb, ability to add memory, i7 processor, great video graphics. I don't need a 24 inch screen, but am curious of the new curved screens. I'm not a gamer, so control paddles aren't even a consideration.

I would like to keep the price around $1200-$1500. I've read a quadrillion reviews and the results are all over the place. Some say the newer HPs are just as good as Dell. Some say Dell is world's better and will tuck you in at night, (see what I mean?). I don't want touch screen. I've heard too many horror stories about when something goes wrong with them. I had a guy that builds his own computers tell me that the all-in-ones are a headache when you want to add memory cards, (remember, future proof).

Any help, advice would be greatly appreciated. Maybe I buy a Theia and kill 2 birds with one stone?
 
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Dragons

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Avoid Dell/HP/Acer at all costs the designs can be funky but seriously if you want upgradability, get a guy at your local computer store to build one for you, for $1500US you can get something pretty decent.

Also don't lock yourself into an i7 Intel isn't top dog anymore, the new gen of Ryzen processors kill i7's on just about every metric with the exception of gaming, even then it's really too close to call.
 

Gunney57

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I consider it a draw between the two at this juncture in real world use.Just make sure you get the biggest SSD you can afford. Also I've had better results with REAL cache (8mb or more) instead of the other crap being pushed.
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Every time I think someone else in the business is using the right stuff, they cheese out on they're stuff too. I agree if you can build your own you are better off. Best to have a friend on the inside if you do. Can save you a ton on software sometimes.
 
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RadarScout

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Avoid Dell/HP/Acer at all costs the designs can be funky but seriously if you want upgradability, get a guy at your local computer store to build one for you, for $1500US you can get something pretty decent.

Also don't lock yourself into an i7 Intel isn't top dog anymore, the new gen of Ryzen processors kill i7's on just about every metric with the exception of gaming, even then it's really too close to call.
I consider it a draw between the two at this juncture in real world use.Just make sure you get the biggest SSD you can afford. Also I've had better results with REAL cache (8mb or more) instead of the other crap being pushed.
Post automatically merged:

Every time I think someone else in the business is using the right stuff, they cheese out on they're stuff too. I agree if you can build your own you are better off. Best to have a friend on the inside if you do. Can save you a ton on software sometimes.
Thanks for the input. I guess I should have mentioned the guy I know that builds his own computers is my daughter's ex-fiance. He really pulled a jerk move. I don't think I want to deal with him. It would deepen scars on her.
 

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@RadarScout What is your budget? That is the most important question.

I assume you will be using your old mouse/keyboard/monitor so all you will need is the tower.
 

RadarScout

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@RadarScout What is your budget? That is the most important question.

I assume you will be using your old mouse/keyboard/monitor so all you will need is the tower.
I'm wanting to stay in the $1200-$1500 range. Not really fond of my Compact monitor. The mouse has a habit of double clicking lately. Drives me insane. The keyboard is fine. Thought about getting a wireless keyboard, but that's not a must have.
 

Dragons

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I don't think I want to deal with him. It would deepen scars on her.
I'm sure there's dozens of others in your area to deal with, you'll always get a better deal that way, add to that brands like Dell often use custom non standard parts, so makes for a nightmare when time to upgrade.
 

V1Jake

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I'm wanting to stay in the $1200-$1500 range. Not really fond of my Compact monitor. The mouse has a habit of double clicking lately. Drives me insane. The keyboard is fine. Thought about getting a wireless keyboard, but that's not a must have.
Copy that. I recommend looking up the youtube channels Bitwit and Paulshardware. They have great up to date vids on computer builds in different price brackets.

The best would be to get an AMD processor, B450? motherboard, fast memory and a decent graphics card (only if you play games or want to futureproof it). $1200 will get you an amazing build that will last for years.
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You can start with the specs in this build and change things around. Probably do a 1tb SSD or two of them for storage and a faster CPU



or you have this vid as well for an $1150 computer. You can change the video card down to an RTX2060 instead of the 2070 and add more storage


 
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wayne77

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Have you considered building yourself? I recently built my first pc and I’ve never attempted to do so before. Went together super easy. I went with the Ryzen 3900, using it mostly as a home server/pleas server. Something like that would be more than you need for your applications but would fit in that budget. You could even drop down to the 3700 and save a few bucks. You’d still have a pretty powerful machine.
 

AlexJ

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Ok folks, I know there's a bunch of smart computer people on here. I need to buy a new computer since the one I currently have was built about the same time Apollo 1 was launched. It's gotten pretty slow and if there are any "motion" ads running, I can almost take a nap before it lets me scroll down the page.

Here's what I'm thinking. Is Dell so much better than HP that it warrants paying a good bit more for compatible components, processors, video and monitors? I will be using it primarily to read emails, read news and events, play Majong and hearts while listening to songs on Spotify. I'm the type that squeezes a Coke can to get the last drop, so it really needs to be something to last several years; future proof if possible. I'm thinking 16g, 1-2tb, ability to add memory, i7 processor, great video graphics. I don't need a 24 inch screen, but am curious of the new curved screens. I'm not a gamer, so control paddles aren't even a consideration.

I would like to keep the price around $1200-$1500. I've read a quadrillion reviews and the results are all over the place. Some say the newer HPs are just as good as Dell. Some say Dell is world's better and will tuck you in at night, (see what I mean?). I don't want touch screen. I've heard too many horror stories about when something goes wrong with them. I had a guy that builds his own computers tell me that the all-in-ones are a headache when you want to add memory cards, (remember, future proof).

Any help, advice would be greatly appreciated. Maybe I buy a Theia and kill 2 birds with one stone?
Buying prebuilt PC's is not a bad idea especially if you don't want to bother with asking someone else to build PC for you. Buying Dell or HP or Lenovo from local Costco or BestBuy is also not a bad idea. And you do not have to spend a lot of money on that. For example even something like this would be good enough for you if you do not play any serious games:


The 6-core Intel CPU is more than enough for all general tasks (you do not need CPU with more cores if you do not do any video editing or image processing or serious gaming), 12GB of RAM is also enough for all general tasks, it has 256GB NVMe SSD which is also pretty fast for everything and big enough for Windows and for installation of few programs which you use every day and has 1TB HDD for storing all your photos and videos, which you can easily upgrade yourself with SSD SATA drive if it will feel slow to use for you. The Intel UHD 630 is also fast enough GPU for all general tasks including playing simple games which you listed. You probably cannot add more storage inside because there are probably no mounting rails for extra drives but you can always buy external HDD or SSD drive if you will need more storage drives. Costco has a 2 year warranty and 90 day return policy for the PCs they sell so it may be a better place for buying than BestBuy. For monitor you just buy whichever one you want, as long as it has HDMI input it will be compatible with such PC.

The prebuilt stuff from Lenovo or Dell will come with some useless bloatware such as trial for Office or McAfee crap but you can easily uninstall all of it. The only major issue with those prebuilt systems is that the motherboard and power supply will have proprietary size so you will not be able to replace them with anything that is not supplied by manufacturer but that should not be an issue if you do not want to do it yourself in the first place and want to rely on warranty and if you are not going to upgrade your prebuilt system with something like 2080 ti GPU to play latest games.
Post automatically merged:

Since I cannot edit my post, I just wanted to add that if you are looking for new monitor to buy - there is a great review site:
 
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poolmon

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The current biggest "future-proof" bang for the Dell buck is the XPS 8930 Gaming Desktop at $1,050.

Intel i7-9700 (8 physical cores plus 8 virtual hyper thread cores) 4.7GHz Turbo speed
NVIDIA GTX 1660 Super Graphics Card with 6GB GDDR6 Memory
16 GB DDR-4 RAM System Memory
1 TB SSD (Yes it is a solid state drive)
WIN 10 Home
While I built my own last 5 computers, if I had to buy one pre-built (of any brand) this is the one I'd buy because you literally would spend that much building it in parts and it can do everything with power to spare.
See link below for more detail . .
 
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Riptide

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If you're looking for another potentially fun hobby then watch some videos on youtube, do some learning, and build a box yourself.
If you'd rather have customer support and easier warranty if something goes wrong then snag the system @poolmon linked above and use the extra $ in your budget to get a nice monitor, mechanical keyboard, and mouse. Don't skimp out on those peripherals as they are your interface to the computer. You're staring at that screen constantly, shouldn't it be nice to look at?
 

V1Jake

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The current biggest "future-proof" bang for the Dell buck is the XPS 8930 Gaming Desktop at $1,050.

Intel i7-9700 (8 physical cores plus 8 virtual hyper thread cores) 4.7GHz Turbo speed
NVIDIA GTX 1660 Super Graphics Card with 6GB GDDR6 Memory
16 GB DDR-4 RAM System Memory
1 TB SSD (Yes it is a solid state drive)
WIN 10 Home
While I built my own last 5 computers, if I had to buy one pre-built (of any brand) this is the one I'd buy because you literally would spend that much building it in parts and it can do everything with power to spare.
See link below for more detail . .
RAM is very slow, video card is not worth it especially with the RTX 2060 performing a lot better for a little bit more. Plus with the case design it sucks to update items inside of it, can't put in custom coolers to make the computer run cooler and more efficiently. I don't recommend it, sorry. Building a computer for that cost yields better results.
 

surprisinguy

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Any of the over the counter companies like Dell/HP are pretty much non upgradeable except for maybe the video card. Their motherboards are setup to bring the customer what they originally buy as the finished product so they can make their profit. I'm for building your own. But if you're totally against it, get a local computer shop to build one for you. You can build/get an awesome computer for $1000 (and under) easily. And I know you said you dont want a larger monitor but once you try one you're gonna like it :)
 

RadarScout

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I just don't think I'm tech savvy enough to build my own computer. A lot of what I'm reading is foriegn to me.

What about this?

HP Pavilion 590-p0055t
This desktop PC exceeds expectations with a new generation of performance, the freedom to store what you need, and a sleek design that cuts down on size.
OPERATING SYSTEM
Windows 10 Home 64 [22]
PROCESSOR
Intel® Core™ i7-9700 (3 GHz base frequency, up to 4.7 GHz with Intel® Turbo Boost Technology, 12 MB cache, 8 cores) [16]
GRAPHICS
Integrated: Intel® UHD Graphics 630
MEMORY
16 GB DDR4-2666 SDRAM (2 x 8 GB)
MAXIMUM MEMORY
Upgradeable to 32 GB
MEMORY SLOTS
2 UDIMM
STORAGE
1 TB 7200 rpm SATA [12]
SECONDARY STORAGE
256 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD [23]
TOTAL EXTERNAL BAYS
One 9.5 mm occupied
TOTAL INTERNAL BAYS
One 2.5" occupied; One 3.5" occupied
OPTICAL DRIVE
DVD-Writer [13]
MEMORY CARD DEVICE
HP 3-in-1 Media Card Reader
NETWORK INTERFACE
Integrated 10/100/1000 GbE LAN
WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY
802.11a/b/g/n/ac (2x2) and Bluetooth® 4.2 M.2 combo [9,10]
POWER SUPPLY
310 W internal power supply
EXTERNAL I/O PORTS
Front:1 headphone/microphone combo; 1 USB 3.1 Type-C™ Gen 1; 2 USB 3.1 Gen 1
Rear:4 USB 2.0; 2 USB 3.1 Gen 1
Rear: [11]
EXPANSION SLOTS
1 PCIe x1; 1 PCIe x16; 2 M.2
VIDEO CONNECTOR
1 HDMI; 1 VGA
AUDIO
5.1 surround sound
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
EPEAT® Bronze registered; ENERGY STAR® certified
COLOR
Natural silver
POINTING DEVICE
HP USB Wired Optical Mouse
KEYBOARD
HP USB Wired Keyboard with volume control
DIMENSIONS (W X D X H)
6.69 x 10.9 x 13.3 in
WEIGHT
11.35 lb
WARRANTY
1 year limited hardware warranty (information at www.hp.com/support). 90 day phone support (from date of purchase). Complimentary chat support within warranty period (at www.hp.com/go/contacthp).
SOFTWARE INCLUDED
McAfee LiveSafe™ Netflix Buy Office [5][18]
  • [1] Part of the total system memory (RAM) is used for graphics/video performance. System memory dedicated to graphics/video performance is not available for other use by other programs.
  • [2] ENERGY STAR and the ENERGY STAR mark are registered trademarks owned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • [3] EPEAT® Bronze registered where applicable. EPEAT registration varies by country. See www.epeat.net for registration status by country. Search keyword generator on HP’s 3rd party option store for solar generator accessories at www.hp.com/go/options .
  • [4] Call 1.800.474.6836 or www.support.hp.com for more information on Care Packs available after 90 days. After 90 days, an incident fee may apply.
  • [5] Internet access required and not included.
  • [6] Service levels and response times for Care Packs may vary depending on your geographic location. Restrictions and limitations apply. Service starts at date of hardware purchase. HP Care Packs are sold separately. For details, visit www.hp.com/go/carepack-services.
  • [7] HP SmartFriend will support any major brand of computer and tablet running Microsoft Windows, OSX, iOS, Android, and Chrome OS. 24x7 support is available in English and in the US & Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec) only. Service availability varies by country/region. Internet connection required for remote support. Remote support not available for tablets. Not all service plans cover support for tablets. HP SmartFriend sold separately or as an add-on feature.
  • [8] Actual speeds may vary.
  • [9] Wireless access point and Internet service required. Availability of public wireless access points limited. The specifications for the 802.11ac WLAN are draft specifications and are not final. If the final specifications differ from the draft specifications, it may affect the ability of the PC to communicate with other 802.11ac WLAN devices.
  • [10] Bluetooth® is a trademark owned by its proprietor and used by HP Inc. under license.
  • [11] USB Type-C™ and USB-C™ are trademarks of USB Implementers Forum.
  • [12] For storage drives, TB = 1 trillion bytes. Actual formatted capacity is less. Up to 35GB of drive is reserved for system recovery software.
  • [13] DVD-Writer does not support DVD RAM. Don’t copy copyright protected materials.
  • [14] New Dropbox users are eligible to get 25 GB of Dropbox space free for 12 months from date of registration. For complete details and terms of use, including cancellation policies, visit the Dropbox website at www.dropbox.com . Internet service required and not included.
  • [15] Up to 512MB of main system memory may be allocated to support video graphics.
  • [16] Multi-core is designed to improve performance of certain software products. Not all customers or software applications will necessarily benefit from use of this technology. Performance and clock frequency will vary depending on application workload and your hardware and software configurations. Intel’s numbering is not a measurement of higher performance. Intel, Pentium, Intel Core, Celeron, Intel logo and the Intel Inside logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.
  • [17] Internet access required and not included. Subscription required after 30 days trial period. McAfee, LiveSafe and the McAfee logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
  • [18] Internet service required and not included. Click the Office icon for more details on the Office product that is right for you. Optional features sold separately or as add-on features.
  • [19] Games may be limited during trial period. Full version games may be purchased at any time. Internet access required and not included.
  • [20] For more information visit hp.com/go/hpsupportassistant [Link will vary outside of the U.S.] HP Support Assistant is available for Android and Windows based PCs.
  • [21] Internet connection required for updating and connecting to HP Support.
  • [22] Not all features are available in all editions or versions of Windows. Systems may require upgraded and/or separately purchased hardware, drivers, software or BIOS update to take full advantage of Windows functionality. Windows 10 is automatically updated, which is always enabled. ISP fees may apply and additional requirements may apply over time for updates. See http://www.microsoft.com
  • [23] Actual formatted capacity is less. Portion of internal storage is reserved for preloaded content.


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GotWake

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I just can’t buy off the self systems. You’ll really won’t save any money building yourself, but you will have better system for the money. I would probably find a local shop to build it if you don’t won’t to mess with it.
 

MurrayB

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Check out MicroCenter there may be store near you or their website. The house brand PowerSpec if they still offer them were generic plain vanilla easily upgraded and expandable.
 

hd732

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Ok, I'll check around to see who builds them and go from there.
Everything being recommended to you is overkill. You are not a gamer. You are a basic user. The system assemblers will rip you off with lots of unnecessary junk. You need a system with an SSD (this will make the biggest performance difference to you). An intel i5-8500 is way more processing power than you will ever need. Remember that an 8th gen i5 is more powerful than a 7th gen i7. I suggest you take a look at an HP prodesk elitedesk off ebay.
Here is but one example and if you wait you can usually find these for 350. This has 2 years left on its next business day on site warranty.
 

V1Jake

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I just don't think I'm tech savvy enough to build my own computer. A lot of what I'm reading is foriegn to me.
See if there is a Micro Center by you. They have everything needed to build a pc and they can do it for you. Price for performance is greatest with a custom build. It's like buying a Honda at BMW prices.
 

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