IR Laser Safety Glasses

KrazyK

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These are the ones I purchased on Amazon. Seem the same as what everyone else on the forum is buying. I haven't used them yet in testing, but they are made for the wavelength our transmitters use.
http://a.co/d/bI4Dj9n
Thanks a million @Goblue . I can easily cross reference this item with Amazon.ca that likely has it in stock and that way I can get free shipping to my door and it will be in Canadian dollars.

--- DOUBLEPOST MERGED ---

and as luck would have it, Amazon.ca does not carry these,
. Looking over everything I could find on Amazon.ca for safety glasses OTG style that I need, they look suspect or have negative reviews. Outside of Amazon in local mechanic's supply stores I found some actual certified laser glasses but the prices tend to start at about $150 and up.

:c00l:
 

sdrawkcaB

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I have to find where I ordered, but with shipping they were less than $20.


EDIT: I ordered from www.rajsupply.com
Honest question... did you ever get a chance to confirm these actually work as described, that they are in fact blocking 904nm light? I'm wanting to get a pair and want to take your recommendation here, but figure it's worth asking first. I'd hate to end up with something that doesn't work as advertised, and not actually know it -- as I don't have any way to verify if it is or not :)
 

thanks

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Honest question... did you ever get a chance to confirm these actually work as described, that they are in fact blocking 904nm light? I'm wanting to get a pair and want to take your recommendation here, but figure it's worth asking first. I'd hate to end up with something that doesn't work as advertised, and not actually know it -- as I don't have any way to verify if it is or not :)
I dont have the means to test, but I've been thinking of seeing if @tempnexus could test them with his equipment, if he still has access to it...
 

KrazyK

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Honest question... did you ever get a chance to confirm these actually work as described, that they are in fact blocking 904nm light? I'm wanting to get a pair and want to take your recommendation here, but figure it's worth asking first. I'd hate to end up with something that doesn't work as advertised, and not actually know it -- as I don't have any way to verify if it is or not :)
In all my searching I did not find a single item that fit over glasses and that could be said to be certified to block the 905 nm range of light for a reasonable price. I did find product but we are talking north of $100, way north. Everything else was "beauty salon" rated. The search continues.
 

DrHow

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Just ordered a pair. I have had some eye pain after testing. Not sure if is was lidar light or age setting in.
If it is age, consider day of testing like a free Lasic eye surgery. Ha ha.

--- DOUBLEPOST MERGED ---

I dont have the means to test, but I've been thinking of seeing if @tempnexus could test them with his equipment, if he still has access to it...
In case you did not see this link yet, video in post worth a watch:

www.rdforum.org: Don't buy laser glasses off eBay!!!!
 

sdrawkcaB

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Here's a video that goes into detail about the fact that even visible laser can often leak eyesight-damaging levels of infrared light.



I did some further research and found a chart of lab and professional grade glasses and goggles which can cover various spectrum ranges. Honeywell used to make some, but discontinued them at the start of 2019. Philips does still make them. This table has details about what wavelengths are covered by what Philips part numbers. Remember that speed enforcement LIDAR is at 904/905nm.

 

nighthawk

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Here's a video that goes into detail about the fact that even visible laser can often leak eyesight-damaging levels of infrared light.



I did some further research and found a chart of lab and professional grade glasses and goggles which can cover various spectrum ranges. Honeywell used to make some, but discontinued them at the start of 2019. Philips does still make them. This table has details about what wavelengths are covered by what Philips part numbers. Remember that speed enforcement LIDAR is at 904/905nm.

I've been himming and hawing about picking up a set. I might end up picking up a pair from Thor labs as that is what I used when in the lab. Slightly pricey though, but safe than sorry.

Have you or anyone found a reliable/trusted brand/pair for testing setups?
 

sdrawkcaB

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Have you or anyone found a reliable/trusted brand/pair for testing setups?
Of the ones offered by Phillips Safety Inc., the BG39+ material are the best suited for 904/905nm based on their Optical Density rating for said wavelength. They would be the best for sensor testing sessions within our realm. The BG39+ material is offered in a variety of lens frame housings, so you can choose any of these lens frame housings and get the same material in whichever frame housing you choose.

 

DrHow

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Honeywell was/is best for its dual use. If you happen to run into national socialist thugs on highway overpass, or outside pointing at cars on highway, they could be visible green or red. Which Honeywell blocks those and UV in 900nm range at same time. According to the video test above.

Wonder if we could find a stash for group buy someplace. I smell a rat. Honeywell, I surmise, was told to “discontinue” them. Heck, they actually had style verses the lab glasses. Could be worn and not get a second look.

what the national socialist BLM/Antifa crowd are using, are serious dangerous. All paid for by the “grant“ money being laundered from donations of $500,000,000 by Cisco, $100,000,000 buy Comcast, $1,700,000,000 given by Bezos Ex wife to groups like this. Billions dolloars more for bricks and 2x4s donated from others companies. Anyway, anyone who drives a truck, or drives for business lots of miles has higher chance of being blasted in the eyes by these sorts. These days Honeywell type glasses are essential to have while moving about.
 

sdrawkcaB

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Honeywell was/is best for its dual use. If you happen to run into national socialist thugs on highway overpass, or outside pointing at cars on highway, they could be visible green or red. Which Honeywell blocks those and UV in 900nm range at same time. According to the video test above.
The DYH material based lenses will block UV and 905nm IR, however will not block the 905nm as effectively as the BG39+ material based lenses. I've posted the wavelength specs from the manufacturer below. I have bolded the lines which apply to the 905nm ratings. Optical Density is the measurement used to represent how effective the lenses are at blocking light at a given wavelength. light is blocked at a given wavelength. As you can see in the specs cited below, the DYH blocks 905nm at an optical density of 5 or greater, while the BG39+ blocks 905nm at an optical density of 10+. The BG39+ material specs are actually very under rated in the summary specifications; If you look at the actual performance graph image on the product pages, you'll see that the optical density at 905nm is much closer to 25+. Chart images are below for reference.

DYH Filter Specification
OD 5+ @190-534nm
OD 5+ @830-1090nm
OD 7+ @1064-1064nm
DYH_Chart.jpg




BG39+ Filter Specification
OD 7+ @190-320nm
OD 7+ @675-765nm
OD 10+ @765-1050nm
OD 10+ @1050-1300nm
OD 10+ @3050-5200nm
BG39_Chart.jpg


Additionally, take a look at this product finder page here. It lets you zero in on the correct material for your wants. Once you have chosen the correct material to match your spectrum specifications, you can then see what frames are available with that material.

Phillips Safety Inc.: Laser Safety Glasses Material Selector by Wavelength
 

DrHow

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The DYH material based lenses will block UV and 905nm IR, however will not block the 905nm as effectively as the BG39+ material based lenses. I've posted the wavelength specs from the manufacturer below. I have bolded the lines which apply to the 905nm ratings. Optical Density is the measurement used to represent how effective the lenses are at blocking light at a given wavelength. light is blocked at a given wavelength. As you can see in the specs cited below, the DYH blocks 905nm at an optical density of 5 or greater, while the BG39+ blocks 905nm at an optical density of 10+. The BG39+ material specs are actually very under rated in the summary specifications; If you look at the actual performance graph image on the product pages, you'll see that the optical density at 905nm is much closer to 25+. Chart images are below for reference.

DYH Filter Specification

View attachment 155903



BG39+ Filter Specification

View attachment 155902

Additionally, take a look at this product finder page here. It lets you zero in on the correct material for your wants. Once you have chosen the correct material to match your spectrum specifications, you can then see what frames are available with that material.

Phillips Safety Inc.: Laser Safety Glasses Material Selector by Wavelength
Oh, the spec sheet show ALL the visual and IR frequencies listed are covered (+7 up to +10) in all the frequencies they list with the same lens? That is cool. I missed that. Thought had to select the freq desired, not cover them all worh one lens. Stand corrected.
 

Saussie

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I'd like to chip in on this.
I purchased a pair, although I'm no tester as such. So from day 1 first shot I'm covered.
After some discussion on here during gathering parts for my set up, I happen to find some discussion which prompted me to invest.
Found some great info here as well as advice. Please discuss if this is suitable, but think the demonstration says it all. I found the exact same pair recommended in this video (eagle pair for 904nm) , selling second hand under an advertisement selling laser hair removal equipment. Might even find something while searching tattoo removal laser safety equipment as well.
(I've since lasered all the hairs off my scrotum to impress the gf and gives it a silky smooth...)
That's enough! Jokes aside. This is serious stuff! Let's get to safety test.
 
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DrHow

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I'd like to chip in on this.
I purchased a pair, although I'm no tester as such. So from day 1 first shot I'm covered.
After some discussion on here during gathering parts for my set up, I happen to find some discussion which prompted me to invest.
Found some great info here as well as advice. Please discuss if this is suitable, but think the demonstration says it all. I found the exact same pair recommended in this video (eagle pair for 904nm) , selling second hand under an advertisement selling laser hair removal equipment. Might even find something while searching tattoo removal laser safety equipment as well.
(I've since lasered all the hairs off my scrotum to impress the gf and gives it a silky smooth...)
That's enough! Jokes aside. This is serious stuff! Let's get to safety test.
However, if one is investing today to protect eyes on LEO laser, spend more money and also get coverage against the overthrowing national socialist army using lasers to blind citizens of all kinds. That is a proper plan. These army of early 1930s style thugs in Germany, are using laser against harmless people just driving from point A to Point B. Get the ones above before the national socialist collaborators in .gov ban these multi frequency eye protection models.

BTW, several pair ordered. Phillips models.
 
Last edited:

nighthawk

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I'd like to chip in on this.
I purchased a pair, although I'm no tester as such. So from day 1 first shot I'm covered.
After some discussion on here during gathering parts for my set up, I happen to find some discussion which prompted me to invest.
Found some great info here as well as advice. Please discuss if this is suitable, but think the demonstration says it all. I found the exact same pair recommended in this video (eagle pair for 904nm) , selling second hand under an advertisement selling laser hair removal equipment. Might even find something while searching tattoo removal laser safety equipment as well.
(I've since lasered all the hairs off my scrotum to impress the gf and gives it a silky smooth...)
That's enough! Jokes aside. This is serious stuff! Let's get to safety test.
Good information. I spent some time doing research on the topic myself. The Eagle Pair safety glasses are pretty good for the price, although watch out for the fakes.

Also something to add is that everyone should be weary of safety glasses people test like the cheaper variants that "filter" some portion of a light spectrum, both for the variation of dyes or changes in dyes used in the lens making process and the testing procedure performed to align with ANSI/CSA codes. These can change the performance of the safety glasses between each pair/revision. Eyes are one of the big things I'm particular about, probably from having experience working around welding equipment and the problems people have had.

Without proper testing equipment to see if the lenses purchased actually protect you I would rather err on the side of caution and pick something up that has been shown to work properly.
 

DrHow

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The DYH material based lenses will block UV and 905nm IR, however will not block the 905nm as effectively as the BG39+ material based lenses. I've posted the wavelength specs from the manufacturer below. I have bolded the lines which apply to the 905nm ratings. Optical Density is the measurement used to represent how effective the lenses are at blocking light at a given wavelength. light is blocked at a given wavelength. As you can see in the specs cited below, the DYH blocks 905nm at an optical density of 5 or greater, while the BG39+ blocks 905nm at an optical density of 10+. The BG39+ material specs are actually very under rated in the summary specifications; If you look at the actual performance graph image on the product pages, you'll see that the optical density at 905nm is much closer to 25+. Chart images are below for reference.

DYH Filter Specification

View attachment 155903



BG39+ Filter Specification

View attachment 155902

Additionally, take a look at this product finder page here. It lets you zero in on the correct material for your wants. Once you have chosen the correct material to match your spectrum specifications, you can then see what frames are available with that material.

Phillips Safety Inc.: Laser Safety Glasses Material Selector by Wavelength
Thanks. several Pair ordered.


To all: this is on topic. 1.) any time we can offer help for RDF member safety, it is on topic. 2.) The right glasses have dual use. First for typical testing of LEO laser, and CM. Second use, in event that any of us is driving a car or semi, and get blinded by these miscreants of society shooting high wattage lasers at us, maybe all of us and our family (wife/children) could be saved from blindness. So, yea, it is on topic. Adding a feature like this is worth mentioning when buying glasses for your hobby.
 
Last edited:

GregTec5

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Can y’all tell me what’s wrong with these? Says it blocks 99%

V2G
GB1850SFT
5.0 IR Filter H2X
IR Blocked
780-2000nm
99%
 

Saussie

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Good information. I spent some time doing research on the topic myself. The Eagle Pair safety glasses are pretty good for the price, although watch out for the fakes.

Also something to add is that everyone should be weary of safety glasses people test like the cheaper variants that "filter" some portion of a light spectrum, both for the variation of dyes or changes in dyes used in the lens making process and the testing procedure performed to align with ANSI/CSA codes. These can change the performance of the safety glasses between each pair/revision. Eyes are one of the big things I'm particular about, probably from having experience working around welding equipment and the problems people have had.

Without proper testing equipment to see if the lenses purchased actually protect you I would rather err on the side of caution and pick something up that has been shown to work properly.
I agree.
This is why I purchased locally in my country, and the glasses were sold alongside laser hair removal equipment, so I presuming that's a higher powered laser. I cross checked this with survival laser online who sell them (same company mentioned in the above video).
I would like to upgrade, it's costly, but worth it.
I definitely won't be in the firing line for long and don't plan on being a tester. Minimal exposure is my plan.
I wouldn't buy this type of stuff from overseas either. If they don't work, you'll want to flex your rights of purchase and country standards when it comes to safety. Good luck holding an overseas court case over something like this.
That said, these don't have an standard badge. Where I'm at, if you import a product and resell it, you wear the public liability.
We all like a bargain, and buy stuff from overseas sometimes because it's cheaper. Be good to put the money you've saved into a local purchase on any safety gear at least. Can't really cut corners on safety.
Anyone know the IR output of a head though? Shouldn't we be making sure the glasses match the purpose?
For the record, mine say the range covered are 190-450 & 800-2000nm OD4+ CE. Mainly for green laser, but triple checked the coverage for red with survival laser, and green being a combination of colour, they have to block both wavelengths.
Super hard to see the red dot in the scope when wearing them to aim.
 
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sdrawkcaB

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Can y’all tell me what’s wrong with these? Says it blocks 99%

V2G
GB1850SFT
5.0 IR Filter H2X
IR Blocked
780-2000nm
99%
Looks like they could be good. I'd try to buy them from a retailer that the manufacturer specifically links to, to avoid getting any fakes. I'd feel more comfortable with them if there was a histogram documenting effectiveness across the spectrum, and even more comfortable yet still if there was some independent testing done on them to verify the manufacturer's specifications on them.

There likely aren't too many people here who have access to a spectrometer in the IR range at or around 905nm. We could always ask though. I'm thinking the most likely people to have one available for use may be the Radenso team, since they've been developing their own detector in house the past few years.
 

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