Some Classic 1970's CB Commercials

jestric

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;) :rofl:
 

Deacon

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I'll be sure not to share anymore info about my equipment. In fact, I was just kidding about even having a CB.
Tuck that lip away, he was just sharing info ;)
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Sweet! Maybe it’s time to go ahead and grab that Styker SR-94HPC I’ve been letting languish in my save-for-later cart as a tiny CB conversion for the truck.

PS I do hope they allow automatic position beaconing on FRS and GMRS. It might encourage the manufacture and sale of nicer radios with real displays and built-in GPS so that blister packs can go upmarket and the CCR’s are less desirable.
 
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Token

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Just found this in my garage.
Anyone remember when you needed a CB license? View attachment 185126

You bet. You had to have a license before either late 1982 or early 1983, I don't remember the exact cut over date.

Originally you could not operate without a physical paper license in possession. Exactly how you got it and what it was (including callsign format) changed over the years, but the basic sequence was you filed for the license, payed your fee, and waited for the license to be sent to you. Later they changed it to you could use a temporary callsign while waiting for your paper license to arrive. If I remember right (really hazy on this) the temporary callsign used your initials and your Zip code.

One typically well informed source claims that during the peak of the CB craze in the late 1970's the FCC were processing about 1 million applications for licenses a month. That is really kind of a staggering number. By late 1982, just before they ended physical licensing, they were still processing about 55,000 a month, but most people were not bothering to get one anyway.

Now for the wayback button, does anyone remember when the 11 meter band was a ham radio band instead of CB, and CB did not yet exist? I do not remember that myself, I am not quite that old, but many of my early ham radios included the 11 meter band as a ham band and my Elmers (knowledgeable experienced hams who introduce the hobby of ham radio to new and aspiring hams) talked about it.

T!
 
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jestric

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You bet. You had to have a license before either late 1982 or early 1983, I don't remember the exact cut over date.

Originally you could not operate without a physical paper license in possession. Exactly how you got it and what it was (including callsign format) changed over the years, but the basic sequence was you filed for the license, payed your fee, and waited for the license to be sent to you. Later they changed it to you could use a temporary callsign while waiting for your paper license to arrive. If I remember right (really hazy on this) the temporary callsign used your initials and your Zip code.

One typically well informed source claims that during the peak of the CB craze in the late 1970's the FCC were processing about 1 million applications for licenses a month. That is really kind of a staggering number. By late 1982, just before they ended physical licensing, they were still processing about 55,000 a month, but most people were not bothering to get one anyway.

Now for the wayback button, does anyone remember when the 11 meter band was a ham radio band instead of CB, and CB did not yet exist? I do not remember that myself, I am not quite that old, but many of my early ham radios included the 11 meter band as a ham band and my Elmers (knowledgeable experienced hams who introduce the hobby of ham radio to new and aspiring hams) talked about it.

T!

Congress noted in approving the law to allow the FCC to stop licensing CB operators that 2 million people, or about 10 percent of all CB operators, were using the radios without any FCC license to begin with.
 

Token

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Congress noted in approving the law to allow the FCC to stop licensing CB operators that 2 million people, or about 10 percent of all CB operators, were using the radios without any FCC license to begin with.

I always thought that number was under estimated. For any 5 CB operators I personally knew in around 1980 at least half of them were unlicensed. However, it is possible that number was driven by all the operators in the 60's and 70's that did get licenses.

I don't think I ever used my official FCC callsign after about 1978 or so. I take that back, I still throw it out on vintage night here locally. Once a month we have a local vintage gear night locally. People bring out the old gear and we shoot the bull on the air using it. We encourage tube gear, but if all you have is "new fangled" solid state stuff you can still talk...but might catch some crap...and give some.

We do the same thing on the ham bands, we have a couple of local "vintage" freqs and nights. We do things like bring out old AM gear on 2 meters and such.

T!
 

spinner55

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KEY-6515 was my parents first CB license back in the late 60's / early 70's. Base was a Golden Eagle 23 channel CB with a CLR-2 antenna. (tubes remember) Even the mobile radio was tubes - crystal controlled 12 channel. 'Everyone' had a CB back then. Quick and easy way to call home. A tone unit was added on back then - didn't find a picture of them. About everyone had a license around our town. After I moved out of the house - got my own call letters and still have them mounted down stairs where the old CB sat for years. It was a 4 x 4 not the standard 3 x 4 ones like posted above.

My old car had a 102 inch whip side mounted on the vehicle. Which would make a sound hitting branches or low hanging items. Liked that old whip as I had great range using it even before adding a dual tube 'footwarmer' in the trunk. (remote controlled by mods made by myself) Was 'only' a 150 watt amp but only used if the 'skip' was running. So we could send the page tones to the base and someone would answer it.

Back in the mid 70's I moved from CB to become a HAM. Never went back....

PS 1968 Lafeyette catalog. Page 106 for a early radar detector. Driver alert for $29.95 one of the first detectors and one like I owned. S and X band. In 2021 USD = $234.22 ... https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-Catalogs/Lafayette-Catalogs/Lafayette-1968-682.pdf

Take care - be safe. Spin
 
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XDA

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I had a 1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Brougham, I mounted a Radio Shack Realistic CB with a telephone handle in it. Bear in mind, cell phones wouldn't come out for another 6 or 7 years & real radio phones were very expensive. I looked like a real hot shot. I hooked it up to a magnetic antenna, I think it was an Antenna Specialist but could have been Radio Shack. The darn thing put out great. It was a lot of fun to have.

I wish CB would make a comeback.

Vintage-Realistic-CB-Radio-Phone-Fone-40-Channel.jpg
 

jestric

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I had a 1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Brougham, I mounted a Radio Shack Realistic CB with a telephone handle in it. Bear in mind, cell phones wouldn't come out for another 6 or 7 years & real radio phones were very expensive. I looked like a real hot shot. I hooked it up to a magnetic antenna, I think it was an Antenna Specialist but could have been Radio Shack. The darn thing put out great. It was a lot of fun to have.

I wish CB would make a comeback.

View attachment 185157


It just might make somewhat of a comeback with the addition of FM to the platform. ;)
 

Token

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KEY-6515 was my parents first CB license back in the late 60's / early 70's. Base was a Golden Eagle 23 channel CB with a CLR-2 antenna. (tubes remember) Even the mobile radio was tubes - crystal controlled 12 channel. 'Everyone' had a CB back then. Quick and easy way to call home. A unit was added on back then - didn't find a picture of them. About everyone had a license around our town. After I moved out of the house - got my own call letters and still have them mounted down stairs where the old CB sat for years. It was a 4 x 4 not the standard 3 x 4 ones like posted above.

Sorry for the minutia below, but I like radio history.

4x4 and 3x4 callsigns depended on when you got them, where you were located when you got them, and what office you filed the paperwork through. Our family had both formats at one time or another.

Earlier, I think before 1964 (I seem to remember hearing the cut over was Jan 1 1964, but that is a very fuzzy memory) the callsign for CB was very different, it was a 1x1x4 or a 2x1x4 callsign. For example, 1A1234 or 10A1234. The first number (1 to 24) was a region identifier, and then the single letter x 4 number was the unique ID. For example California was either 11 or 12 region, depending on south or north, so a person in Los Angeles would have 11A1234. The letter was typically either A or W, but there were some other letters for specific reasons. To make matters more confusing, I think the issuing of the new 3x4 callsign format started in early 1962, so by late 1962 you heard 1x1x4, 2x1x4, and 3x4 formats with everyone switching in early 1964.

To make matters worse, there were some earlier formats hanging around (until 1964) from the first days of CB in mid 1958 that had other than A or W (or Q, another variation) as the letter in a 1x1x4 or 2x1x4 format, which could have ended up adding double letters in the 1x2x4 and 2x2x4 formats, i.e. 1AB1234 and 12AB1234.

Worse yet, the CB service actually started in 1947. This was not the Class D 11 meter band, but a Class B UHF CB service. And there was some early, non-ham, experiments going on in 11 meters that would eventually lead to the 11 meter CB band. And those callsigns looked like, but were not, ham calls. They looked rather like ham 1x3 format stuff, such as W7XML and W2XRV and the regions correlated to the 10 ham regions, so 0 to 9 in the number slot. Notice the X in the leading suffix letter, that was what made them different form ham callsigns. These callsigns continued into early Class D CB on 11 meters, I am not sure of the exact cutoff date for each formats use (can't find the specific regs on each) but I believe that in early 1962 all of them would have still been technically legal if you had not renewed your license.

So I think (not confirmed) that in early 1962 you could have heard the formats of W7XML, 6W1234, 12W1234, 5BQ1234, 14BA1234, and KBB1234.

Re your base station, was it a Golden Eagle Mk 1 or a Mk II? The Mk I and Mk II looked essentially identical, but the II had a small text "Mark II" under "Golden Eagle". I still have my father-in-laws original Mk II, as well as his Mk III and my Mk IV.

For those not aware, the Golden Eagles were pretty much the top of the heap in CBs. There were several makers in the price point, which is truly staggering when you understand what that means. In 1969 a complete Browning Golden Eagle setup, 23 channels AM and SSB, consisted of the Golden Eagle II 69R receiver, Golden Eagle II 68T transmitter, Golden Eagle II SSB-15 SSB transmitter, a Golden Eagle II Transadapter, and a Golden Eagle II phone patch. You could also get the matching Golden Eagle II BB180 amplifier, but of course no one would do that unless they had a business application. The total list price (which was pretty close to street price) in 1969 dollars was about $1100, or a tad over $8100 converted to todays spending power. For a CB. The most basic parts of this setup were the TX and RX, which could be operated without the other gear in a 23 channel AM only mode, had a street price of about $400 in 1969 dollars, or about $2900 today.

And yes, that is a separate receiver, AM transmitter, SSB transmitter, and Transadapter to make them all work together. 4 different pieces of hardware to make up a basic 23 channel AM and SSB transceiver. Back in the day separate transmitters and receivers were common, less so in CB application.

Here are pictures of my Golden Eagle II receiver, AM transmitter, and SSB15 SSB transmitter.

Golden Eagle II receiver:
64201052.NOxP2JQ3.GE_MKIIR.jpg


Golden Eagle II AM transmitter (left) and SSB15 SSB transmitter (right):
64201053.92FZiPcq.GE_MKIIT_SSB15.jpg


T!
 

Token

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I had a 1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Brougham, I mounted a Radio Shack Realistic CB with a telephone handle in it. Bear in mind, cell phones wouldn't come out for another 6 or 7 years & real radio phones were very expensive. I looked like a real hot shot. I hooked it up to a magnetic antenna, I think it was an Antenna Specialist but could have been Radio Shack. The darn thing put out great. It was a lot of fun to have.

I wish CB would make a comeback.

View attachment 185157

That is a Realistic (Radio Shack) TRC-456, it was introduced in 1978. It replaced the older 23 channel version, the TRC-56 (the -56 did not have an LED readout). There were similar things, CBs with telephone handsets, sold by other companies, such as Johnsons Messenger series. And there were several base stations with the same setup.

I have several, 3 or 4, different CBs configured like this, including the same model in your picture.

T!
 

jestric

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Like many of you, I had a number of CB Radios over the years, but the Galaxy 959B with SSB was my favorite. :cool:


Galaxy_DX959B_CB_Radio.jpg
 
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Deacon

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It just might make somewhat of a comeback with the addition of FM to the platform. ;)
Exactly why I went ahead and ordered that Styker setup. Going to get these NMOs punched into the roof before a road trip with 5er in mid September. Might as well see if CB is just as useless these days as I remember. But if nothing else I will be bristling with radios and a scanner.

Now I’m wondering if my Larsen NMO2/70SH can be repurposed for my Midland GMRS setup. I totally won’t just MARS mod my FTM-400…right? ;)
 
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Lucky225

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Just found this in my garage.
Anyone remember when you needed a CB license? View attachment 185126
If you live in MN you can still get CB plates with your old CB call sign :p


1627917114169.png

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If I remember right (really hazy on this) the temporary callsign used your initials and your Zip code.
Donno if that's true or not, but if so Part 95 still gives a nod to it:

§ 95.417 (CB Rule 17) Do I identify my CB communications?

(b) [You are encouraged to identify your CB communications by any of the following means: (1) Previously assigned CB call sign; (2) K prefix followed by operator initials and residence zip code;
 
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spinner55

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Sorry for the minutia below, but I like radio history.


To make matters worse, there were some earlier formats hanging around (until 1964) from the first days of CB in mid 1958 that had other than A or W (or Q, another variation) as the letter in a 1x1x4 or 2x1x4 format, which could have ended up adding double letters in the 1x2x4 and 2x2x4 formats, i.e. 1AB1234 and 12AB1234.

Hello Token,

Well I 'lived' in those days. Yep I am old.

The local call sign here was 16W1834. (had forgotten about that one) But the FCC had a problem with those calls. Seems the US wasn't able to use those call signs. Only N / W and a few others per international law. That is why they disappeared. The FCC was in the wrong for giving them out. They where using other countries call signs at times. They 'thought' they could since it was a 'local only' use license. But as we all know - you can work long distances on CB during peak years. I still have QSL cards from Australia / Germany and Italy from working stations there.

I never saw a 2x2x4.. only 2x1x4 call signs back then. 5 watt max unless you got licensed for a commercial business license. Those where 15 watts. (non-CB channels) Even remember some Motorola Mocom radios in the 27 mhz range. Unknown if FM or AM.

27 Mhz Business channels still listed by the FCC. No known gear available that I can find made anymore.

27.43
27.45
27.49 Itinerant
27.51 2 watt
27.53

On to Golden Eagles - Yes the top of the line radio. Just know that I worked a long time to save up to buy it. Bought it out of what I made on the paper route. Was a lot of money back then. (min wage was $1.60 back then). I had a 160 papers to deliver 7 days a week. After school came home to work the route which was later split with my other brothers. So I only had to do 85 or so. Sunday was a morning route - up at 5:30 AM and done by 8AM. Fond memories of doing it.

Think it was a Mark II with SSB - had upgraded the antenna to a the 23 ft Super CLR2 from a plain CLR.

One thing for sure - you could tell who had a Golden Eagle. No mistaking the 'ping' when you keyed up the mike. Was the best part of owning those radios. PING..KPK1365 this is KEY6515 you around?? Then Modulator would call back - she had a voice that drove the skip off the channel. Her hubby was Blackfoot - a real Blackfoot Native American. Great couple - didn't have much. Still remember their car with two 9 foot fiberglass bumper mounted on it. Could hear him everywhere. Best when he pointed the front of the car at you.

Would love to get a copy of the old licenses - but the FCC destroyed all the CB licenses back in the 90's. Only one I have left is my old 4x4 one down stairs. (no haven't gone down to look at it.)

Last 'high power' CB I used was the Siltronix 1011D Comanche made by Swan. But the final tubes didn't last long if driven hard. I see them on eBay all the time. Sometimes 'parts only' etc.

After that I went into ham radio. Learned 5 wpm morse code and took the test. Got 2 ham licenses in the mail. Per the FCC they let me pick the one I wanted. Sent the other back - then years later at a Chicago fishing / boating expo. Ran into the ham that got that call. (the guy that i went there with was also a ham). So we had portables and this guy spotted us. Came over to chat and the rest is history. Btw I am a extra class now - that's a story in itself.

Take care, I could chat for hours about CB stuff. Spin
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Absolutely! :cool:

Ham radio always has been (and still can be) an expensive hobby. Although you can pick up a Baofeng UV-5R HT (or some other Chinese radio) for next to nothing, when you start to try and piece together an even halfway decent shack you'll end up spending a lot of money.

Heck, I still can't believe what I spent on my Motorola XPR 7550e DMR HT several years ago. 😮

You get what you pay for. The Baofeng radios are very 'dirty' signal wise. A 2 way shop showed how bad they where. I'll stick with Kenwood etc. Sure I pay more for them but they are pretty clean.

Yes I have a couple of rare Motorola 220 portables. Just trying to find the programing software for them. Ham radio / flying even fishing cost money. Depending what you buy etc.

Take care Spin
 

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Token

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Now I’m wondering if my Larsen NMO2/70SH can be repurposed for my Midland GMRS setup. I totally won’t just MARS mod my FTM-400…right? ;)

Of course not, the fact it is against the rules, there is a law against it, means that you could not possibly do it. Not only is it unthinkable, it is not possible because the law says so.


Hmmmm...come to think of it, my FTM-400 might be one of the only pieces of semi-modern ham gear I have that is not modded. I must correct that.

T!
 

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