Theia - New Feature Request

Status
Not open for further replies.

NVR2FST

Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Advanced User
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,665
Reaction score
1,500
Location
Somewhere in cyberspace.
I'm affraid you didn't understand. I need to automaticly mute radio while RD alerting. Simple but very useful feature.
I think JBV1 does that now with the V1. @JohnBoy is developing his app to be compatible with Theia, I think. So I would imagine that you could handle music muting that way.
 

NoLimits

Learning to Drive
General User
Joined
Sep 5, 2020
Messages
34
Reaction score
35
Hmm, interesting. But how it connects to the radio? BT?
 

Vancity23

Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Advanced User
Joined
Jun 11, 2017
Messages
5,527
Reaction score
6,893
Location
Vancouver, B.C.
Yes, when I had V1 Driver for ios, when an alert was received it muted the music, then turned it back on again after, it worked beautifully.
 

Britain

Learning to Drive
General User
Joined
Dec 23, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
39
Just asking this here, because I don't know where else to ask it. I swear I heard that Theia will be able to tell if the threat is moving or stationary. Is that correct?
 

Jon at Radenso

Manufacturer
Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Corgi Lovers
Advanced User
Manufacturer
Joined
Oct 9, 2012
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
21,231
Age
31
Just asking this here, because I don't know where else to ask it. I swear I heard that Theia will be able to tell if the threat is moving or stationary. Is that correct?

Unfortunately, that is not possible with Theia.
 

G37X Jockey

Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Advanced User
Joined
Jul 22, 2012
Messages
2,044
Reaction score
2,770
Location
Behind my Steering Wheel
Just asking this here, because I don't know where else to ask it. I swear I heard that Theia will be able to tell if the threat is moving or stationary. Is that correct?
Theia will be able to differentiate I/O from C/O though.
 

Disco47

Roll Tide
Beginner User
Joined
Aug 25, 2020
Messages
303
Reaction score
592
Location
Alabama, USA
No, they don’t. None do currently.
If you get blasted for 2 seconds and then nothing...it's gonna be I/O. If you get a constant alert, it's C/O. That's what I'm referring to.
 

sdrawkcaB

Defender of Light 📶
ModSec
Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Advanced User
Joined
Mar 6, 2018
Messages
6,478
Reaction score
13,889
Location
Here
If you get blasted for 2 seconds and then nothing...it's gonna be I/O. If you get a constant alert, it's C/O. That's what I'm referring to.

🤔

And if it’s a quick blip from six miles away, was it I/O or was it a whiff of C/O at the edge of the SnR environment and capabilities of the detector?
 

Rags

Tumbleweed
Advanced User
Joined
Oct 26, 2011
Messages
2,048
Reaction score
1,566
🤔

And if it’s a quick blip from six miles away, was it I/O or was it a whiff of C/O at the edge of the SnR environment and capabilities of the detector?
And if Theia gets that same whiff at the edge of the SnR, will there be enough detail for it to analyze it and determine what signal it is?
 

aim4squirrels

Coming soon.....
Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Corgi Lovers
Advanced User
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
3,954
Reaction score
8,241
Location
DFW Texas
And if Theia gets that same whiff at the edge of the SnR, will there be enough detail for it to analyze it and determine what signal it is?
I would say yes, provided it works as they are claiming.

It's a digital device. So it's either yes or no. Take a tv as an example: Today's TVs have digital tuners. When the signal is too weak you just lose the picture, which is why you get a frozen picture with what is called digital tiling, until the signal is strong and clean enough for it to continue. Sometimes it appears as if it's a quick pause and a "garbled" signal, but that's due to a fast scan rate.

The TV's of yesterday could show a picture with a good amount of "snow" (the static in both the picture and the sound). What you're seeing is the signal literally falling into the noise floor, where it's strength isn't great enough for the TV's antenna to distinguish the true signal from the background noise of the world. It's kind of up to the end user to determine if it's usable or not.

As @Nine_C1 always says, a "better bucket" will net you a better signal. Bigger antennas do this for tv signals, whether we're talking digital or analog. You can collect more signal and therefore receive from further away, if all other factors remain the same. There's also line amplifiers, or "boosters" that can function in a similar manner as an LNA does in a detector.

In a detector I believe it is safe to consider "the bucket" anything up until the signal is converted to the digital domain. So we don't just consider the horn, but LNAs and any other engineering techniques that prevent signal loss once acquired.

The signal any detector is receiving is analog, but on the conversion to digital either the detector can use the collected data or it can't. If it can't it's thrown out that scan cycle. If it can, then the data carried on that signal is validated and usable for whatever analysis the detector can do.

Pretty sure all the big 4 currently on the market are playing in the digital realm now with their flagship detectors: Escort, VR, Uniden, and Radenso with Theia. So in that instance, they are all operating in the same manner with respects to receivng and converting to a digital signal process.

If Theia's bucket is better than other detectors' buckets, it's going to alert first (assuming an apples to apples comparison) and give you whatever data it's gleaning from that signal.
 
Last edited:

Rags

Tumbleweed
Advanced User
Joined
Oct 26, 2011
Messages
2,048
Reaction score
1,566
I would say yes, provided it works as they are claiming.

It's a digital device. So it's either yes or no. Take a tv as an example: Today's TVs have digital tuners. When the signal is too weak you just lose the picture, which is why you get a frozen picture with what is called digital tiling, until the signal is strong and clean enough for it to continue. Sometimes it appears as if it's a quick pause and a "garbled" signal, but that's due to a fast scan rate.

The TV's of yesterday could show a picture with a good amount of "snow" (the static in both the picture and the sound). What you're seeing is the signal literally falling into the noise floor, where it's strength isn't great enough for the TV's antenna to distinguish the true signal from the background noise of the world. It's kind of up to the end user to determine if it's usable or not.

As @Nine_C1 always says, a "better bucket" will net you a better signal. Bigger antennas do this for tv signals, whether we're talking digital or analog. You can collect more signal and therefore receive from further away, if all other factors remain the same. There's also line amplifiers, or "boosters" that can function in a similar manner as an LNA does in a detector.

In a detector I believe it is safe to consider "the bucket" anything up until the signal is converted to the digital domain. So we don't just consider the horn, but LNAs and any other engineering techniques that prevent signal loss once acquired.

The signal any detector is receiving is analog, but on the conversion to digital either the detector can use the collected data or it can't. If it can't it's thrown out that scan cycle. If it can, then the data carried on that signal is validated and usable for whatever analysis the detector can do.

Pretty sure all the big 4 currently on the market are playing in the digital realm now with their flagship detectors: Escort, VR, Uniden, and Radenso with Theia. So in that instance, they are all operating in the same manner with respects to receivng and converting to a digital signal process.

If Theia's bucket is better than other detectors' buckets, it's going to alert first (assuming an apples to apples comparison) and give you whatever data it's gleaning from that signal.
Comparing digital TV signals to digital processing of analog signals is apples and oranges. Processing an analog signal that is just poking above the noise doesn't lend itself to being analyzed on the weaker side bands to look for those characteristics. There will need to be an order of magnitude (at least) of sensitivity increases to enable this to occur while being competitive with today's top detectors. Radenso says they can do it, I can't wait to see it both in hardware and in action.
 

aim4squirrels

Coming soon.....
Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Corgi Lovers
Advanced User
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
3,954
Reaction score
8,241
Location
DFW Texas
Comparing digital TV signals to digital processing of analog signals is apples and oranges. Processing an analog signal that is just poking above the noise doesn't lend itself to being analyzed on the weaker side bands to look for those characteristics. There will need to be an order of magnitude (at least) of sensitivity increases to enable this to occur while being competitive with today's top detectors. Radenso says they can do it, I can't wait to see it both in hardware and in action.
I disagree, but we shall see.
 

Rags

Tumbleweed
Advanced User
Joined
Oct 26, 2011
Messages
2,048
Reaction score
1,566
I disagree, but we shall see.
You disagree that an analog broadcast is different than a digital broadcast? Do you also disagree that decoding radio broadcasts is vastly different than detecting them?
 

aim4squirrels

Coming soon.....
Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Corgi Lovers
Advanced User
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
3,954
Reaction score
8,241
Location
DFW Texas
You disagree that an analog broadcast is different than a digital broadcast? Do you also disagree that decoding radio broadcasts is vastly different than detecting them?
The waveform being broadcast is analog. There is additional data in a "digital" signal which is how we get sub channels like channel 4.1, 4.2, etc. or HD radio stations like hd1, hd2, etc., but the fundamental wave that carries that data is analog.

From my understanding of what Jon had posted in a very early video about Theia is that they have the ability to interpret that "extra data" like all the other detectors that currently filter, but more importantly for things like identifying I/O shots, there are characteristics of the actual analog wave form that they can "see" like the initial power spike of an I/O shot that are unique identifiers of the particular form of use that Theia is identifying as I/O. That is a characteristic of the actual signal itself (it's "shape", "color", or "signature" if you will) that make it identifiable and it's going to be a part of the received signal regardless and converted to digital info to be processed because that particular detector is looking for that information. To my knowledge, no other detectors are looking for that type of information or is even able to process it currently.
 

Rags

Tumbleweed
Advanced User
Joined
Oct 26, 2011
Messages
2,048
Reaction score
1,566
Ok, then it's clear you don't understand what I am saying so I will bow out of this line of discussion as it's pointless.
 

Benji

Premium Plus
Lifetime Premium
Advanced User
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
4,149
Reaction score
2,200
Location
San Antonio, TX.
Will Theia be able to filter out leaky/cheap radar detectors as well as BSM?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Discord Server

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
90,097
Messages
1,370,593
Members
22,673
Latest member
Jaycik112
Top