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V1Jake

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Good evening guys. I started studying Morse Code a few days ago and picked it up pretty quick. I pretty much have all letters and numbers memorized and I'm working on the characters.

Do any of you know of a good mobile Morse keyer? I have a Yaesu FT-7900, not sure if anything is compatible with that or I will need to run a separate system. Thanks!

- .... .- -. -.- -.-- --- ..-
 
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“Your Welcome”

QRV

Are you sure you have the correct mobile radio and not a typo? IIRC the FT-7900 is a dual band 2m/440 FM only transceiver IE you will not need a Keyer as it does FM only. Talk simplex or through repeaters FM voice only.

As for mobile keys, I like using paddles. For me it is much easier using right and left motion with an auto keyer instead of trying to get the correct touch with a straight key while driving (any bumps and the code is toast unless it was supposed to be all Dits). Plus I prefer using paddles while sitting at a desk so it keeps it all the same motion and muscle memory wise.

I use a Bencher BY-1 mounted on a piece of curved Kydex that has a strap with Velcro on each end to secure it around my leg .

Mobile dual band with CW would be a Kenwood 751 or any of the 100W HF through 2 or 6M all modes. But my next question is who are you going to QSO with as I don’t hear much 2/440 CW out there. My home ICOM 271H 2M all mode really only gets used on FM and SSB. My ICOM 706 IIG is all mode but I have only used CW on HF and 6M, never on 2M or 440.

QRU

.
 

Chris KH2PM

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I'm not an active on CW HF, but I do know CW and often ID ground based NAVAIDs (VORs, ILS etc) while fling the Jet at work. We're required to identify all ILS CW ID's on an Instrument Approach. All have to do is listen. The other pilots have to cross reference the Jeppesen chart to verify it.
 

V1Jake

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I'm not an active on CW HF, but I do know CW and often ID ground based NAVAIDs (VORs, ILS etc) while fling the Jet at work. We're required to identify all ILS CW ID's on an Instrument Approach. All have to do is listen. The other pilots have to cross reference the Jeppesen chart to verify it.
That's interesting, first time I've heard of that regarding NAVAIDS. I dispatch for a major airline in the US and I'll text some of my crews for some conversation. Thanks for the info Chris, appreciate it.
 

Chris KH2PM

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That's interesting, first time I've heard of that regarding NAVAIDS. I dispatch for a major airline in the US and I'll text some of my crews for some conversation. Thanks for the info Chris, appreciate it.
I fly Boeing 757 & 767's, and the ILS has to be audibly verified via the CWID of the ILS. It's in the AOM. Newer aircraft may have an automatic verification built into the avionics suite. The B767-400 with PFD/ND that I fly does so we don't have to audibly check the ILS CWID. To clarify, we don't have to audibly ID VOR NAVAIDs as the FMC does that on it's own.

For my own practice sometimes I'll tune around on 10 meters to find a CW Beacon and try to copy it.

Sorry for the confusion!

Contrats on learning Morse Code! It's not easy!
 
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Also ADFs squawk their ID in Morse so the beacon can be identified and matched up on a Jeppeson Chart. Atlanta's ADF squawks KATL the Airport ID in Morse usually with a K or W prefix. Atlanta's VOR squawks ATL and Peachtree Dekalb Airport squawks PDK. For example Toronto Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada squawks YYZ.


Which is where the Rush Song YYZ came from. The other band members heard the VHF Omni Squawk in the background while Alex Lifeson was piloting them in a private plane landing in Toronto and the rhythm stuck with the band so they wrote the song YYZ.

Dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dah-di-dit


For non-morse folks, a Dah is a dash and a Dit or Di is a Dot. When reading or writing morse, the Di is used when multiple Dots are used in a row with the last Dot being the Dit, so "S" which is . . . (dot dot dot) is written di-di-dit where DE for Dragon Eye would be Dah-di-dit dit

.
 

Token

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Which is where the Rush Song YYZ came from. The other band members heard the VHF Omni Squawk in the background while Alex Lifeson was piloting them in a private plane landing in Toronto and the rhythm stuck with the band so they wrote the song YYZ.

Dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dah-di-dit

For non-morse folks, a Dah is a dash and a Dit or Di is a Dot. When reading or writing morse, the Di is used when multiple Dots are used in a row with the last Dot being the Dit, so "S" which is . . . (dot dot dot) is written di-di-dit where DE for Dragon Eye would be Dah-di-dit dit
And further for non-Morse folks, this Dit Dah thing is done because they approximate the sounds of the dots and dashes as sent and heard. The rhythm if you will. Each letter / number / punctuation / prosine you send or receive in Morse is made of elements. The dots and dashes, and their spacing, are those elements.

When you copy Morse you do not (well, you are not supposed to) hear or think to yourself “dot” or “dash”, you hear the sound combinations of the elements and that translates to the character. Dah-di-dah-dit dah-dah-di-dah is the sound of CQ, if you have really learned the code the sounds never take the shape of dots and dashes. Translating from sound to dots and dashes, and from there to letters, simply does not work for anything beyond a few characters or at anything beyond entry level speeds.

The following video example kind of illustrates this, with speed. This is a video of a Russian sourced Morse spy numbers station on my YouTube channel ( https://www.youtube.com/user/FirstToken/videos , there you will find many radio signal examples, mostly HF and non-broadcast examples, often "oddities"). For the first 2 minutes of the video it is repeating “253 253 253 1” over and over, and at a speed slow enough you can make out the individual elements of each character. You can hear the dots and dashes and you can, even if not a code person, figure out each letter given some time. But at 2 minutes and 2 seconds into the video (you can jump ahead if you don't want to hear all the repeating intro) the message starts in earnest, and the speed picks up quite substantially. At this point each character becomes a sound of its own, and the individual elements fade out.

T!
 
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Exadata

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Also ADFs squawk their ID in Morse so the beacon can be identified and matched up on a Jeppeson Chart. Atlanta's ADF squawks KATL the Airport ID in Morse usually with a K or W prefix. Atlanta's VOR squawks ATL and Peachtree Dekalb Airport squawks PDK. For example Toronto Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada squawks YYZ.


Which is where the Rush Song YYZ came from. The other band members heard the VHF Omni Squawk in the background while Alex Lifeson was piloting them in a private plane landing in Toronto and the rhythm stuck with the band so they wrote the song YYZ.

Dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dit-dah-dah dah-dah-di-dit


For non-morse folks, a Dah is a dash and a Dit or Di is a Dot. When reading or writing morse, the Di is used when multiple Dots are used in a row with the last Dot being the Dit, so "S" which is . . . (dot dot dot) is written di-di-dit where DE for Dragon Eye would be Dah-di-dit dit

.
1581451629672.png
 

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