Can CHP cross state lines?

Chupacabras

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I just witnessed a CHP pull over someone in Yuma, Arizona. By what I saw in Waze the CHP probably was in CA and got him in CA. I’m just curious if they can cross state lines to issue you a ticket. TIA


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Exadata

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Hummm, interesting. If the CHP tagged em in CA the CHP could argue that in court but, you can argue in court that the ticket was physically issued out of the CHP's jurisdiction. I'm no lawyer, just my 2 cents. I'd imagine that the CHP didn't issue a ticket and just preached about whatever the driver did wrong.
 
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Chupacabras

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Hummm, interesting. If the CHP tagged em in CA the CHP could argue that in court but, you can argue in court that the ticket was physically issued out of the CHP's jurisdiction. I'm no lawyer, just my 2 cents. I'd imagine that the CHP didn't issue a ticket and just preached about whatever the driver did wrong.
Yea I thought there was some kind of emergency because he just flew by me, but I remembered my detector caught something and looked on waze to see where it came from. I then see him pull over someone in front of me, so it got me thinking . I better ask because if it happens to me as I cross state lines and think haha u can’t pull me over I’m in another state then he pulls me over the jokes on me


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Chupacabras

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Just spoke to a sheriff where I was eating and he said if the violation was recorded or witnessed in CA he can cross state lines to issue you the ticket. There you go guys you’re not safe even when you cross state lines

Haha just answered my own question.

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wjbertrand

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I think they usually respect state lines unless you made some kind of particularly egregious violation in California before crossing the border. They might follow you across in that case. My only state line / HP experience was SB on 395 in NV, just before the CA border. I was riding too fast when a NV trooper passed me going the other way, still on the NV side. I glanced in my mirror and see his brake lights come on almost immediately after he passed me. Oh oh. No radar or anything so I just slowed to the speed limit and that darn trooper followed me the remaining couple of miles all the way to the state line. At that point he turned around again. Whew! I was sweating bullets.
 

sdrawkcaB

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Hummm, interesting. If the CHP tagged em in CA the CHP could argue that in court but, you can argue in court that the ticket was physically issued out of the CHP's jurisdiction. I'm no lawyer, just my 2 cents. I'd imagine that the CHP didn't issue a ticket and just preached about whatever the driver did wrong.
I’m not a lawyer, so take this with a grain of salt. I think that it has to do with where the violation occurred. If he caught him speeding and happened to pursue and catch up to him within a short time (seconds or a minute or two) across the state border without losing visual contact, then I would expect the citation would stand. There is the violation, and then the stop. Technically the police doesn’t have authority to stop someone in another state; but if you didn’t stop and tried to ignore them, they’d just radio you in to the other state’s police and get you for something else by them according to the other states laws. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

I don’t think you could argue against the violation, but you may be able to argue against the stop itself being done illegally, if the police hadn’t yet turned on their lights and sirens signaling you to stop before you crossed the state line. I could see that being a technical defense approach.
 

Chupacabras

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I’m not a lawyer, so take this with a grain of salt. I think that it has to do with where the violation occurred. If he caught him speeding and happened to pursue and catch up to him within a short time (seconds or a minute or two) across the state border without losing visual contact, then I would expect the citation would stand. There is the violation, and then the stop. Technically the police doesn’t have authority to stop someone in another state; but if you didn’t stop and tried to ignore them, they’d just radio you in to the other state’s police and get you for something else by them according to the other states laws. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

I don’t think you could argue against the violation, but you may be able to argue against the stop itself being done illegally, if the police hadn’t yet turned on their lights and sirens signaling you to stop before you crossed the state line. I could see that being a technical defense approach.
Just spoke to a sheriff where I was eating and he said if the violation was recorded or witnessed in CA he can cross state lines to issue you the ticket. There you go guys you’re not safe even when you cross state lines



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LeftLaneInPA

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Disclaimer: Not a lawyer nor a cop.

I believe it has to do with "hot pursuit". If the cop witnesses the violation / crime and is in active pursuit, they can cross state lines and make an arrest (or traffic stop). If there's a reasonable delay between the crime or violation and the cop losing sight of the suspect, they have to pass it off to the area's police. And even then, if an arrest is then made, the suspect can demand a extradition hearing.
 

doubledge

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I concur with the idea that it's where the violation occurred for the most part as long as we are talking about civil offenses. Most neighboring states and counties have agreements for things like that. But, it's one thing to stop you just over the state line and another if they were in a serious pursuit that was prolonged into the neighboring jurisdiction, as noted above. If that's the case they can still chase you but need to notify the local police who would then take charge.
 

knight_man

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Not a cop or lawyer here either but I’m pretty sure I read that if the violation and pursuit starts in a state they can cross lines to engage. Where I live people think speeding up and crossing the state line is a get out of jail free card but all it really does is piss off the pursuing occifer. And at some point it becomes a pursuit that means more fines and charges from more municipalities depending on who gets involved in the chase.
 

erickonphoenix

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Might depend on the violation and whats involved. I fumbled right over a Stealth Sugar Land Charger one way way out of Sugar Land and he punched his lights on tailed me for a second then broke off after I slowed. He would have been in the middle of Houston which is HPDs purview.
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Not a cop or lawyer here either but I’m pretty sure I read that if the violation and pursuit starts in a state they can cross lines to engage. Where I live people think speeding up and crossing the state line is a get out of jail free card but all it really does is piss off the pursuing occifer. And at some point it becomes a pursuit that means more fines and charges from more municipalities depending on who gets involved in the chase.
Definitely high speed pursuits. I've seen em do that.
 

Autotech198

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They legally have to "notify" the other state of the "entire situation" . The other state may monitor or take over the traffic stop based on the officers testimony or enter into reciprocity and allow the officer to cite you . And if you have any violations at that time (bad plates, dark tint) you can also be cited twice, one in each state. In court, I argued a officer "followed me into another state" no lights or sirens and issued a seatbelt and loud music citation. The judge ruled his own "Judicial Powers as a Judge" couldn't take place outside of his state and had to dismiss the ticket due to lack of jurisdiction. A lawyer could definitely use that in a plea deal.
 

oldcelt

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You know that this kind of destroys all of those Duke of Hazard shows where all they have to do is to cross the county line. Oh well, I still have fond memories of Daisy Duke
Catherine Bach now
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LeftLaneInPA

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kwthom

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What? She's thicc.
...and, what - 65 years old?

Hey, look, not everyone can be Raquel, m'kay?



IANAL There could be situations where it simply takes a phone call to the AZ DPS Troopers to let them know there's an inter-agency request to back them up on the stop.

The CHiPPie simply has to let his dispatcher know they have crossed a state line, so they can be covered when it comes to the report.

Now, here's the interesting perspective...they may only have radio coverage in AZ for a fairly short distance, and the repeater antenna patterns will stay (mostly...) in CA. Thus, if the perp decided to go five or ten miles into AZ, CHiPPie may run out of radio range fairly quickly.

I realize some states in the east may not have the problem, but assume that the radio repeaters (especially out there...) are covering dozens of square miles of range.

In the end, there's a cost-benefit equation running thru a cop's mind in pursuit across a state line.
 
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