RJ11 Telephone Cord for Power Cord???

schwinn

Learning to Drive
General User
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
I found it's easier to get pre-built cable, then cut the cable and do what you want on that end. I also double-check using a DVM to ensure I have the right pins before wiring up power to it.

Or, in the case of a 2-wire setup (that's what I used on my R3) I only put in 2 wires, so it's easier to tell which one is where...
 

Leadfut

Learning to Drive
General User
Joined
Oct 15, 2018
Messages
16
Reaction score
13
Thanks Schwinn- but I wanted to reuse the whole cigarette lighter assembly. If I was making my own hardwire harness, I'd have just used 4-flat wire and it would have been a lot easier :cool:

Update- I used the connectors linked further up in the thread and it worked fine, the first time.
 

KnightHawk

Learning to Drive
General User
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Messages
334
Reaction score
327
Location
Somewhere Out There
Good find! Show Me Cables is a good cable supply source. I picked up bulk #26 AWG[/b[cable from them at a great price. Replacing an RJ-11 connector on a round cable is going to be a challenge without the pass through feature. There does not appear to be a big difference between the RJ-11 connector for a round cable and one designed for flat cable.

GTO_04
This is the the key when buying the cable. It fits perfectly in the slot. Just did mine last night repairing the old RJ11 due to the RJ11 not latching/locking the jack in place after so long of using it - taking off and installing the RD on the windshield. Bought the RJ11 plugs from HomeDepot for around $6 for 25 pcs(4 wire). Wanted to buy it from Amazon because it was cheaper but could not wait for 2 days and need to order at least $25 to get free shipping but all I need at the very moment was the RJ11 jacks. Used the old one for reference purposes to know where the wires for positive and negative slots where. My old cord has the red and black colored wire and it was easy enough. For those who has not done it yet, if you guys don't know where the positive and negative wires are inserted, you position the RJ11 jack to were the flat part is on top and the latching mechanism is on the bottom. In this position, the wire slot should be facing you and insert the wires in slot 2 (negative) and 3 (positive) from the left for the 4 connector RJ11. As others have stated, you need a crimping tool. Luckily I had one available. You don't have to strip the wire. The RJ11 jack has pins and is secured and connected when the crimping tool is use.

Editing now - sorry for bold letters.

Post automatically merged:
This is the the key when buying the cable. It fits perfectly in the slot. Just did mine last night repairing the old RJ11 due to the RJ11 not latching/locking the jack in place after so long of using it - taking off and installing the RD on the windshield. Bought the RJ11 plugs from HomeDepot for around $6 for 25 pcs(4 wire). Wanted to buy it from Amazon because it was cheaper but could not wait for 2 days and need to order at least $25 to get free shipping but all I need at the very moment was the RJ11 jacks. Used the old one for reference purposes to know where the wires for positive and negative slots where. My old cord has the red and black colored wire and it was easy enough. For those who has not done it yet, if you guys don't know where the positive and negative wires are inserted, you position the RJ11 jack to were the flat part is on top and the latching mechanism is on the bottom. In this position, the wire slot should be facing you and insert the wires in slot 2 (negative) and 3 (positive) from the left for the 4 connector RJ11. As others have stated, you need a crimping tool. Luckily I had one available. You don't have to strip the wire. The RJ11 jack has pins and is secured and connected when the crimping tool is use.

Editing now - sorry for bold letters.
Something went wrong and could not edit it for some reason. Sorry guys.
 
Last edited:

knight_man

I wanna go fast
Intermediate User
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
518
Reaction score
689
So from a former tel tech and commercial network cable installer, the pass thru are called ‘EZ’ connectors. If you do get some, and your crimp tool does not have the cutter, it is very easy to cut the ends off yourself with snips or dykes. Just make sure it is a clean cut and you aren’t shorting the pairs where you cut them manually. Use the outter jacket to crimp down and hold your connector on the wire, you don’t want or need to expose copper on the actual wires to make a good connection. I recommend just buy a bunch of ends and some cable and practice practice practice. It is very easy, eventually, and cat3 or phone line is cheap. I reterminated both ends of my V1 chord in the car on a lunch break one day between halves of a sandwhich.

I have terminated hundreds or thousands of rj45 and rj1x ends, never even thought of looking for a round cable style end. Nice find.

One thing I didn’t see in plain black and white, and might explain some of the difficulty some people are having. RJ45/RJ11 can be designated for stranded or solid copper. Most of the shipped power cables are stranded.
 

Discord Server

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
78,517
Messages
1,195,195
Members
20,007
Latest member
HWYDSGNR
Top