RJ11 Telephone Cord for Power Cord???

Deacon

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The common RJ11 plug lets you use the same cord for Uniden, Escort, and the V1. That eliminates the need to re-do your hardwired installation if you switch RDs.
For sure. Plus, mini, micro, C, there are all kinds of varying standards that can be used.
 

davidc502

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The common RJ11 plug lets you use the same cord for Uniden, Escort, and the V1. That eliminates the need to re-do your hardwired installation if you switch RDs.

GTO_04
Of course now that they know it......................... <sarcasm> they will be building their own custom connectors :)
 

benzr

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Finding a "pre-made" phone cord that is Real Wire and has a "heavy" enough gauge wire is almost impossible to find today. I have some I have used like you are talking about but they were older and hard to find. It's hard to tell what the wire is like until you cut it and strip wire.

If wire is too thin or has fiber filler it won't give enough power to run detector. The longer the wire the better quality it needs to be.

Another issue with phone cords is that sometimes the pin outs flip from one end to other end so be careful with polarity, color on one end might not be in same location on other end.

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THIS ^^^^^^^^^^^^

X10

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Deacon

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The reality is you should never really need to go farther than a few feet with a “telephone” cord. If you’re looking at even 15 feet or longer for some reason, you should really be either finding a power source closer to the destination or running a standard 14 gauge stranded wire from the power source (where it should be fused!) to near wherever you’re going to use it. But hey, if you want to stretch it a little, you can go with something like this with good enough gauge (26) solid copper wire and good strain relief at the ends—which coincidentally the one review is from someone powering their V1 with it: Amazon.com: Kenable ADSL 2+ High Speed Broadband Modem Cable RJ11 to RJ11 3m (~10 feet) Black: Computers & Accessories
 

benzr

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One thing that NEEDs to be said ...
Even though the radar detector may power up and work. ... if the wire is too thin/weak when under a heavy power load .... i.e Detector alerting full scale or if processing BSM Filters ... it could and i stress could cause issues or even power down. Make sure you are using good quality thicker wires.

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Deacon

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I really think that’s mostly much ado about nothing. Be picky, sure, but you don’t need to go crazy. You don’t get to choose much in the way of “thicker” wires these days, even if you go with a bulk spool and make them yourself, unless you’re going to try to repurpose some other sort of solid wire for that, which is unnecessary. And it doesn’t really matter. 26 AWG is plenty unless you’re making a very long run for some reason—and if so then you’re using the wrong tool for the job.

Windshield detectors draw very little power, even at full tilt. It’s still generally measured in milliamperes at 12V, and it actually starts at more like 13.5V or higher for most automotive systems, and they work fine usually down into the mid/high 11’s. It would take an exceptionally heavy load and some exceptionally poor wiring to get to the point where you’re starving the detector for power even over an 8 or 10 foot run.

The 10’ cable I linked before, with 26 AWG solid copper wires and internally integrated strain relief should be more than enough for anyone and costs $3.24, with free shipping. They have them in longer lengths as well, even 50’. But if you somehow need longer, than 10’, which is exceptionally rare, then as I said before, you should either find a power source closer to the destination or run a standard and inexpensive 14 gauge stranded power/positive wire from the power source (where it should be fused!) to near wherever you’re going to use it.
 

GTO_04

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I really think that’s mostly much ado about nothing. Be picky, sure, but you don’t need to go crazy. You don’t get to choose much in the way of “thicker” wires these days, even if you go with a bulk spool and make them yourself, unless you’re going to try to repurpose some other sort of solid wire for that, which is unnecessary. And it doesn’t really matter. 26 AWG is plenty unless you’re making a very long run for some reason—and if so then you’re using the wrong tool for the job.

Windshield detectors draw very little power, even at full tilt. It’s still generally measured in milliamperes at 12V, and it actually starts at more like 13.5V or higher for most automotive systems, and they work fine usually down into the mid/high 11’s. It would take an exceptionally heavy load and some exceptionally poor wiring to get to the point where you’re starving the detector for power even over an 8 or 10 foot run.

The 10’ cable I linked before, with 26 AWG solid copper wires and internally integrated strain relief should be more than enough for anyone and costs $3.24, with free shipping. They have them in longer lengths as well, even 50’. But if you somehow need longer, than 10’, which is exceptionally rare, then as I said before, you should either find a power source closer to the destination or run a standard and inexpensive 14 gauge stranded power/positive wire from the power source (where it should be fused!) to near wherever you’re going to use it.
Good find on that cable. I use #26 AWG and it works fine. Not sure of the exact length, but probably 8-10 ft. The voltage at my R1 reads 14V when I am driving and never any malfunctions. It is more difficult to find in #26 AWG but still available.

GTO_04
 

butterman

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An rj11 I think would only power on your detector.
If you want to wire up a switch for muting then you'll want an rj14, the difference being it has 2 more wires each for led and mute.

See this thread, dbranger94 has already reverse engineered one of the smart cords.

I wired up my own mute switch with an rj14 cable using the above schematics, and can confirm thoae circuits are correct. I haven't done the led circuit yet.
 

Deacon

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An rj11 I think would only power on your detector.
If you want to wire up a switch for muting then you'll want an rj14, the difference being it has 2 more wires each for led and mute.
Yes, yes, it’s been covered before. The only difference is one of semantics, and everyone just refers to it as RJ11 no matter how many conductors are present. The connector is the same regardless, and everyone seems to be familiar with it.
 

butterman

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Yes, yes, it’s been covered before. The only difference is one of semantics, and everyone just refers to it as RJ11 no matter how many conductors are present. The connector is the same regardless, and everyone seems to be familiar with it.
A good clarification, rj11 6p4c = rj14. I didn't want OP to order the wrong part by accident :)
 

BlueV1

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It would have been nice if they had thought ahead a little.
RJ-11 = 2 conductors or RJ-11 6p2c
RJ-14 = 4 conductors or RJ-11 6p4c
RJ-25 = 6 conductors or RJ-11 6p6c

They could have named it RJ-11-2, RJ-11-4, RJ-11-6 or RJ-11a, b, and c, etc.

[Edit] To retain naming simplicity;
RJ-62 for 6p2c
RJ-64 for 6p4c
RJ-66 for 6p6c

RJ-88 for RJ-45 8p8c
RJ-84 for RJ-45 8p4c
RJ-8s for RJ-45 8p split pairs :)
 
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Leadfut

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Tangentially related-
I have several Belscort RDs with the remote mute switch and alert LED on the cigarette lighter plug. One of the cables went bad. I cut the end off and tried to crimp a new RJ11 on it, but the cable is round and the wires don't go cleanly into each pin 'hole'. I had some RJ-11 connectors on hand but they are 'closed' in the front and won't let the wires poke through. Also the cable uses stranded copper wires instead of solid copper so the strands just want to open up and go everywhere.
I've fixed/made modular cables before with flat cable (stranded and solid), but with round cable, it just doesn't seem to want to go together easily.

The only thing I can think to do is use the type of modular plugs that allow you to 'stick through' the front face of the connector before crimping and trimming. Like this:
41jjLiPUwkL.jpg


(Yes I know these are RJ-45... not the right connectors for this application).

Has anyone run into this problem before and do you know where to get RJ-11 connectors that work this way?

Do these allow 'stick through'?? -> Amazon.com: Monoprice RJ11 6P4C Plug Flat Stranded, 50-Piece/Bag (107268): Computers & Accessories
 
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GTO_04

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Tangentially related-
I have several Belscort RDs with the remote mute switch and alert LED on the cigarette lighter plug. One of the cables went bad. I cut the end off and tried to crimp a new RJ11 on it, but the cable is round and the wires don't go cleanly into each pin 'hole'. I had some RJ-11 connectors on hand but they are 'closed' in the front and won't let the wires poke through. Also the cable uses stranded copper wires instead of solid copper so the strands just want to open up and go everywhere.
I've fixed/made modular cables before with flat cable (stranded and solid), but with round cable, it just doesn't seem to want to go together easily.

The only thing I can think to do is use the type of modular plugs that allow you to 'stick through' the front face of the connector before crimping and trimming. Like this:
View attachment 129315

(Yes I know these are RJ-45... not the right connectors for this application).

Has anyone run into this problem before and do you know where to get RJ-11 connectors that work this way?

Do these allow 'stick through'?? -> Amazon.com: Monoprice RJ11 6P4C Plug Flat Stranded, 50-Piece/Bag (107268): Computers & Accessories
No that is for flat cable. You need the RJ-11 connector designed for round cable. I am glad you asked this question. This is the first time I have seen RJ-11 connectors designed for round cable. Now I have a source for parts to repair my round cables should the need arise. So far I have only had to repair the flat cables I use for my hardwired installations. I have ordered from Monoprice before and their connectors are of high quality.

GTO_04
 

Leadfut

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Thank you! That is exactly the information I was looking for. It looks like the ones you linked to do have the 'stick-through' feature too.
 

Leadfut

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Thank you! That is exactly the information I was looking for. It looks like the ones you linked to do have the 'stick-through' feature too.
Update; Ordered the RJ-11 connectors for round cables (Prime got them here quick!). It does NOT have the stick-through feature. Without stick-through you have two choices:
-Strip the outer jacket down so far that it won't be captured on the cable crimp
-Strip the outer jacket the correct amount, but then just hope that the wires go into their designated holes because you can't adjust the wires (for example; to nudge them into their holes) once they go into the housing


But, I think I found connectors that have the stick-through feature:

Platinum Tools 100026B EZ-RJ12/11 Connector, 100-Pack - Crimpers - Amazon.com (100 pack, ~$30)

EZ-RJ12 / RJ11 Feed Through Modular Connector - 6P6C - Round Cable (~50c ea in small quantities $4 shipping)

100026B EZ-RJ12 Modular Plug: Platinum Tools, 6P/6C Pass-Thru (40c ea $10 shipping)
 
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GTO_04

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Update; Ordered the RJ-11 connectors for round cables (Prime got them here quick!). It does NOT have the stick-through feature. Without stick-through you have two choices:
-Strip the outer jacket down so far that it won't be captured on the cable crimp
-Strip the outer jacket the correct amount, but then just hope that the wires go into their designated holes because you can't adjust the wires (for example; to nudge them into their holes) once they go into the housing


But, I think I found connectors that have the stick-through feature:

Platinum Tools 100026B EZ-RJ12/11 Connector, 100-Pack - Crimpers - Amazon.com (100 pack, ~$30)

EZ-RJ12 / RJ11 Feed Through Modular Connector - 6P6C - Round Cable (~50c ea in small quantities $4 shipping)

100026B EZ-RJ12 Modular Plug: Platinum Tools, 6P/6C Pass-Thru (40c ea $10 shipping)
Good find! Show Me Cables is a good cable supply source. I picked up bulk #26 AWG cable from them at a great price. Replacing an RJ-11 connector on a round cable is going to be a challenge without the pass through feature. There does not appear to be a big difference between the RJ-11 connector for a round cable and one designed for flat cable.

GTO_04
 

Deacon

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Having done so much round RJ45 work, I would assume RJ11 is the same, just shove it in there and check your work visually before crimping.
 

Leadfut

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Having done so much round RJ45 work, I would assume RJ11 is the same, just shove it in there and check your work visually before crimping.
I tried, but with stranded wires instead of solid copper, and the lack of ability to push the individual conductors out the front of the connector, coupled with the much smaller size of RJ11 vs RJ45, caused me to fail. Even under magnification, I couldn't quite see which wire ended up in which 'hole' for sure, nor could I see individual strands of copper to see if they all stayed together or not...

I suppose I could open up the cigarette lighter cable side and then be able to 'ohm out' to the connector to be sure....
-- Double Post Merged: --
Good find! Show Me Cables is a good cable supply source. I picked up bulk #26 AWG cable from them at a great price. Replacing an RJ-11 connector on a round cable is going to be a challenge without the pass through feature. There does not appear to be a big difference between the RJ-11 connector for a round cable and one designed for flat cable.

GTO_04
I have a small handful of things in the cart but I know that right after I checkout, I'll think of three more things I should have put in the order....
 

GTO_04

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Having done so much round RJ45 work, I would assume RJ11 is the same, just shove it in there and check your work visually before crimping.
The wires in a round cord (I haven't tried putting an RJ11 on a round cord yet) may have some twist to them so it may be a little more difficult to get them to stay lined up in the right position when you put them into the RJ-11. So it could be a potential issue.

GTO_04
 

Deacon

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I tried, but with stranded wires instead of solid copper, and the lack of ability to push the individual conductors out the front of the connector
I forgot about the stranded wires bit. Never tried that one before. But I’ve also never once in my life ever used or even looked for connectors with wire push-through. I can see how that concept would be nice here, though.
 

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