Why do the Japanese do this with rotors?

crabu2

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I noticed this years ago.. The Japanese cars I've done brake work on always have a threaded hole in the rotor to make removal very easy. American cars.... not so much. Why don't all manufactures do this?

I'm asking because just today.. I replaced the rear rotors on my Camry, which has almost 300K miles on the original factory rotors.. Pulling the old rotors were easy as can be by using 2 M8-1.25 bolts. When I did rotors in my Expedition years ago, I had to use a sawzall on one side to get it off..

BTW, I lost a lug nut! I have no idea where it went.. I had them all sitting together in a box.. but one disappeared.. I'm just really baffled as to where it disappeared to...
 

johnboy00

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I've never, ever had a problem getting a rotor off any of my American cars. If it doesn't come right off, a heavy mallet always does the trick.
 

crabu2

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I've never, ever had a problem getting a rotor off any of my American cars. If it doesn't come right off, a heavy mallet always does the trick.
Maybe because they don't use road salt in the winters in NC? Up here, it seems everyone has problems getting rotors and hubs off... That Expedition was the worst I've ever had to deal with. In the past, I've always been able to get rotors off with a mull and some pb blaster.. But that Expy... I tried soaking it in pb blaster for more than 24 hours. used some bolts and the Power steering to try and break it loose....heat, and hammer the crap out of it.. one side came off, but the other side, I only got it off by cutting it off.
 

rider9195

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More "American" cars have them than you would think. Here in the rust belt it is hit and miss with that threaded hole helping pull the rotor off. Sometimes it is great. Other times you can barely start a bolt and if you can the rotor is so rusted on it just strips the hole out.

A lot of HD trucks have them on the rear brakes. I'd take a set of full floating rear end brakes any day, they're super easy and rust doesn't make much difference on them.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

OBeerWANKenobi

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I've actually ran into some that had tapped jack screw holes but I still couldn't get them off. I actually stripped out the threads. LOL

This is why that I apply "Never Seez" to the ID of the rotor and hub contact face while doing my brakes. I use that stuff on all kinds of nuts and bolts as well under the vehicles if I ever want to get them off again.
 

omgboost

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I've actually ran into some that had tapped jack screw holes but I still couldn't get them off. I actually stripped out the threads. LOL

This is why that I apply "Never Seez" to the ID of the rotor and hub contact face while doing my brakes. I use that stuff on all kinds of nuts and bolts as well under the vehicles if I ever want to get them off again.
Never heard of that. I use permatex anti sieze. My BMW has the screw too
 

OBeerWANKenobi

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Never heard of that. I use permatex anti sieze. My BMW has the screw too
I think it's basically the same stuff but a different brand. I was introduced to "never seez" first so I just call everything "never seez". I'm pretty sure the stuff I actually have on my shelf in my shop is Permatex so it's actually anti-seize.

It's kind of like how every tissue is a Kleenex. ;)
 

bentvalve3g

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That Expedition was the worst I've ever had to deal with.
We had an Expedition when I was growing up in Wisconsin (salt heaven). My dad was fighting with disc removal and somebody suggested he make a "pusher" to help the disc off the hub. Basically it was threading a lag bolt through each caliper mounting screw from the backside and tightening each incrementally. Worked for one side, cracked and broke the other disc...anyway, use anti seize/never seize like OBeer said but it sounds like you've already completed the job!
 

CobawLT2010

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I replace the rotors every other brake job. Not because they are rusty but usually they are warped by then. Never had issues with my merican cars.
 

Andrew21

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Everytime I change rotors on any car, I slather this copper anti-seize stuff all over the face of the inner hub. Makes it so much easier for the rotor to come off next time. It does work though :)
 

HaloInReverse

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Been wrenching on VW's & Audi's for the past 20 years. Every brake job I've done has a set screw to secure the rotor to the hub.

While it does make life easier, it's a total PITA when that screw is either seized or decides to break.
 

CobawLT2010

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Been wrenching on VW's & Audi's for the past 20 years. Every brake job I've done has a set screw to secure the rotor to the hub.

While it does make life easier, it's a total PITA when that screw is either seized or decides to break.
Lol just looked it up (I’ve never worked on VW or Oudies). Of course it would be torques... leave it to the Germans.
 

ShadowTrooper

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Never really had an issue getting rotors off between Michigan and Florida. Worked a bunch at Nissan development and I, nor anyone else there, actually used those holes for removal.
 

CPB

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Why do the Japanese do this with rotors?
Because they work smarter not harder?
-- Double Post Merged: --
Been wrenching on VW's & Audi's for the past 20 years. Every brake job I've done has a set screw to secure the rotor to the hub.

While it does make life easier, it's a total PITA when that screw is either seized or decides to break.
I always hit them with a deadblow and an impact screwdriver now.
 

auskip07

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ive had the opposite effect.. ive drilled out a few of those screws because after a while the screw metal gets soft after so many heat cycles the phillips head strips out. on american cars i usually do what johnboy does and use a rubber mallet or my small sledge hammer if im replacing them (i usually replace them)

The screws are not necessary. the wheel and lugs do a good job holding the rotors on when it matters.

in the south unless you park in the grass your car is generally rust free for 15 years. after that its surface rust.
 
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BlueV1

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My Wife had an Expedition with rotors that were stuck. Seems to be a common issue on those.

Our Honda's both came with the screw for holding on the rotor during factory assembly. I drilled them out within 5,000 miles on both. They were already stuck.:)
 

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