Radar absorbers

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#1
I didn't notice much here on the subject. Is there a reason for that?
 

G37X Jockey

Premium Member
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Jul 22, 2012
1,102
809
Behind my Steering Wheel
#2
The reading I've done is that radar absorbers work, but the material in its current form is very difficult to apply to a car without ending up looking like a nurf-mobile. Something transparent and very flexible like a clearbra would be ideal, but to my knowledge doesn't exist yet.

Posted from my SM-A520W using the RDF Mobile App!
 

Deacon

TXCTG
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Newly Registered
Nov 13, 2016
7,491
8,318
Hill Country, TX
#3
Yeah, there’s no such technology available to consumers other than some (very pricey) sheet foam that, as @G37X Jockey so aptly put it, would look absolutely ridiculous like some sort of Nerf car, and of course multiple layers of foam would never hold up. It would be a Mythbusters style exercise for the fun of it only.
 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#4
I was thinking the material would be installed behind the bumper skin. That alleviates any looks/weather issues.

Any links to where some could be purchased?
 

Deacon

TXCTG
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Newly Registered
Nov 13, 2016
7,491
8,318
Hill Country, TX
#5
How would that do you any good at all? It’s already bounced back off the entire rest of the car and the bumper itself as well. Go cut up some pool noodles and glue the pieces to the back of the your bumper, and it will work just as well ;)
 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#6
It was my understanding radar actually goes through thin plastic membranes and bounces off the metal behind. That isn't true?

I'll leave the pool noodles for you to challenge yourself with.
 

Choose Life

35.5 hater R3 Day One User
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Jan 14, 2017
7,604
8,569
Charlotte North Carolina
#7
It was my understanding radar actually goes through thin plastic membranes and bounces off the metal behind. That isn't true?

I'll leave the pool noodles for you to challenge yourself with.
No
The return happens off any object
Different materials are very reflective allowing sensitive detectors to pick up fringe signals
Essentially a radar detector is a radio tuned to the police channel

Some material absorbs radar like trees
But it only works as a loss on range to the detector and the gun
The range loss is enough to prevent speed readings in some situations but more often than not instant on radar under a quarter mile usually results in blue lights at 15+
This subject is so complicated it cant be described in one post
I would hang around and read up on the subject
 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#8
My thought wasn't an absorber to fully absorb the radar. My thinking was would it be possible to reduce the range a vehicle is radar visible to the extent it was worthwhile. Worthwhile is subjective, but if it takes an instant on an additional 1-2 seconds to lock on that's 1-2 seconds of reaction time that may make a difference.

However if radar reflects at the paint surface then the absorber does no good unless it were glued to the bumper. An yeah, that would be ugly nerf.
 

tempnexus

City 17 Rep
Premium Member
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Jul 31, 2015
3,533
3,599
108
DMV
#9
The reading I've done is that radar absorbers work, but the material in its current form is very difficult to apply to a car without ending up looking like a nurf-mobile. Something transparent and very flexible like a clearbra would be ideal, but to my knowledge doesn't exist yet.

Posted from my SM-A520W using the RDF Mobile App!
Plus the material I am aware of is highly carcinogenic. So yeah...not really consumer friendly and it requires regular maintenance for it to be worth a damn.
 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#10
Regular maintenance? Do you mean if it is exposed?

--- DOUBLEPOST MERGED ---

I'm having problems with the idea that a painted bumper cover reflects radar. From the Radenso RC M installation manual:
Determine the best location for the front
radar antenna. Typically, the best location
is behind a flat portion of the plastic
bumper. Alternately, the antenna can be
mounted behind the grill.

I take this as a confirmation that a radar absorber can be mounted behind the bumper skin and still be effective (at least nearly as effective as if it were installed on the exterior).
 

Deacon

TXCTG
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Newly Registered
Nov 13, 2016
7,491
8,318
Hill Country, TX
#11
You’re jumping the wrong conclusions. If a bumper doesn’t reflect any radar, then how would putting radar absorbing material behind it even help since it’s already a black hole? The rest of the car isn’t made of magical stealth bumper material, either.
 

Solidjake

Heterodyne
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Oct 31, 2010
3,741
3,036
Terra
#12
This is what you are looking for...

 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#13
You’re jumping the wrong conclusions. If a bumper doesn’t reflect any radar, then how would putting radar absorbing material behind it even help since it’s already a black hole? The rest of the car isn’t made of magical stealth bumper material, either.
??? Radar is reflected off the metal that is behind the bumper skin. If there is absorber between the bumper skin and the metal structure behind it then there's less radar being reflected as it has to go through the absorber twice.
 

Deacon

TXCTG
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Newly Registered
Nov 13, 2016
7,491
8,318
Hill Country, TX
#14
There’s the entire rest of the car to contend with regardless. I think you’re kind of in the middle of a forest fire wondering about the safest way to put out a candle.
 

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#15
This to reduce the radar profile, not eliminate it. If I can cut the radar reflectivity of 30%+ of the front profile by half that is significant.

Can anyone post a link to a radar absorber material?
 

Deacon

TXCTG
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Newly Registered
Nov 13, 2016
7,491
8,318
Hill Country, TX
#16
It’s been mentioned here by name. Maybe a link, I don’t recall.
 

Choose Life

35.5 hater R3 Day One User
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Jan 14, 2017
7,604
8,569
Charlotte North Carolina
#17
30% wouldn't translate to a fixed # of seconds when IO is used
Start with the trio
Never leave home without
Waze running
The best detector for your terrain and type of radar used
Laser parking sensors
 

InsipidMonkey

Premium Monkey
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Acceptus
Newly Registered
Mar 22, 2017
4,645
8,009
New England
#18

Dwill

Learning to Drive
General User
Newly Registered
Dec 5, 2018
14
6
#19

Eloi

Premium Member
Premium Member
Advanced User
Intermediate User
Beginner User
General User
Newly Registered
Jan 13, 2013
4,424
4,067
#20
https://www.rdforum.org/index.php?threads/42053/

The difficulty lies in the nature of the radar waves : every metallic surface , even metallised plastic
acts as an antenna , so the solution would be to coat a good part of pieces inside the car ...a mess.
The largest reflector is the radiator / headlights.

I found this tube explaining a bit the history of ram , graphite or carbon is the main ingredients.
Tunable electrilcally ram is the future....